• life,  South Korea,  travel

    our big fat Korean wedding – part 3

    This is the third part in my Korean trip cycle. To read the previous parts, follow the link below: our big fat Korean wedding – part 1 our big fat Korean wedding – part 2 This is probably the only post which I write with no pictures on the subject. The answer’s simple. That was my second day in South Korea and apart from taking pictures with my friends, I didn’t take any others. And I do not really want to post pictures of other people. They are not even on Facebook!!! the wedding Anyway, I’m not sure if my friends’ wedding was typical or not. I did some research…

  • life,  South Korea,  travel

    our big fat Korean wedding – part 2

    This is the second part in my Korean trip cycle. To read the previous parts, follow the link below: our big fat Korean wedding – part 1 As I mentioned in a previous post, we flew with Asiana and it was a great choice. Because it’s a Korean carrier I was a bit stressed about the food or the amount of space aboard the plane but it was way better than my British Airways experiences so far. I’m a rather tall person and I could easily stretch my legs, which is of the utmost importance if you’re forced to sit in one spot for 11 hours. The food was very…

  • life,  South Korea,  travel

    our big fat Korean wedding – part 1

    Before I share with you my thoughts and memories from Korea, a few words of introduction are needed. The trip happened in 2019 and, as always, I took plenty of notes during and shortly after my travel. I started to work on my new website, where the Korean journey was supposed to be one of the first posts published. I also started studying ILM Level 7 Diploma in Executive Coaching and Mentoring which proven to be more time and effort consuming than I planned, especially with the pandemic hitting the world. And in my area of expertise, it hit really hard. There were not too many people moving around the…

  • business,  life,  Poland,  travel

    My intercultural journey

    Hello, My name is Konrad Wdowiak and I was born in Poland in 1976, when the communist regime realised that it is supported by less and less Polish citizens. At one point they decided to introduce Martial Law, blocked the borders so no one could leave the country; not too many people could come in neither. And Lublin, my hometown, is the place where people of different religions and nationalities used to live together for hundreds of years. The remnants of its former burghers’ cultures are still there. During communist rule they were kept timidly hidden and never praised like those people have never existed. But they were still there:…