• nature,  traditions,  USA

    Halloween in the Midwest – part 3

    This is the third and the last post about my road trip and just like in the previous ones (part 1 and part 2), there are plenty of pictures you can click on in order to enlarge them. entering South Dakota We were heading towards Rapid City, that’s where we were planning to stay for the next couple of nights. The drive was not too long, only around 4 hours, but it was not an interstate highway which means we had to cross some towns instead of bypassing them. I just had to be more cautious behind the wheel. But it was good and interesting ride, definitely not as monotonous…

  • nature,  USA

    Halloween in the Midwest – part 2

    This is the second post about my Midwestern road trip; the first one is here. There are plenty of pictures and all are clickable if you want to see the bigger version. the road trip As I mentioned in the previous post, travelling to Chicago seemed to be the best option. We got the first flight of the day westwards from London Heathrow operated by the American Airlines which was probably not even 1/3 full. And flying aboard the Dreamliner makes a difference. During long-haul flights, even the mid-day ones, the cabin crew forces people to shut the blinds and increases the temperature so passengers would sleep instead of bothering…

  • nature,  USA

    Halloween in the Midwest – part 1

    When we were driving across New England in May and June this year, little did we know that it’s not our only time in the US in 2022. In August, I have decided to participate in the SIETAR USA conference which was held in Omaha, Nebraska. There were some deliberations about fitting it in our schedules; we normally have some holidays planned in November when London is grey and gloomy; this would make it either/or situation. At the end we made up our minds, we’re having beach holidays in January instead. Nebraska is part of the Midwest, the area of the United States which is kind of in the middle…

  • life in the UK

    The National Health Service and other diseases – how to find a doctor in the UK

    Finding a doctor is one of the first things people usually do when relocating to another country. It may be for different reasons, not necessarily an actual need for one, but most of it for peace of mind, especially if moving with children. Signing up to a General Practitioner (family doctor) in the UK is even more important because it simply makes your life easier in case you end up in hospital or look for a specialty doctor. This article is about the NHS and will tell you how to deal with your medical needs when living in the United Kingdom as an expat. This post will be dead serious,…

  • culture,  South Korea,  traditions

    our big fat Korean wedding – part 4, jimjilbang/Korean sauna

    This is the last post before the summer holiday break and I decided to continue with my Korean adventure. It is the fourth part in my Korean trip cycle. To read the previous parts, follow the links below: Before I took off to Korea, I did some research. Many sources recommended a visit to jimjilbang, which in Korean culture is what sauna is in Finnish, onsen in Japanese, banya in Russian, hammam for Turkish – a cheap public bathhouse. All of the local friends we met during our trip suggested exactly same thing, but of course I knew better. I wasn’t going to “waste” my precious time to see a…

  • culture,  UK

    The British Museum – part 1

    Living in London has many advantages in comparison to living in any of the cities of the world. Of course, for some people those would be disadvantages and they would do anything just to move out to the countryside, I am not one of them, though. Once a capital of the empire on which the sun never sets, now still one of the capitals of the world – London, living here suits me well enough. One of the things I love doing in my spare time is going to the museums. Ruling the huge piece of the Earth once, meant getting access to its treasures, of both natural and human origin.…

  • nature,  USA

    The US National Park Service – part 1

    We are all familiar with the idea of “a national park”; we take it for granted that all over the globe there are protected areas which we can visit and enjoy for their natural beauty and importance. But it wasn’t always like that. Of course hundreds of years ago, there were game reserves restricted to use by all but royalty and nobility, unfortunately it was for their particular interests only. There was no protection in mind; one of the best evidence for this is the story of an auroch – the animal only kings could hunt for meat and recreation. It still didn’t save it from extinction. This post is…

  • business,  coaching,  mentoring

    coaching and mentoring – strategic purpose and usage at executive and senior levels

    Coaching and mentoring are two of the effective approaches in Learning and Development which are gaining popularity nowadays. Since they were developed, they keep expanding and evolving across different organisations. The executive level officers are aware of the advantages of introducing these to companies, especially for the employees from the mid-level and up. Since both are, opposed to training, focused on establishing longer term, not necessarily immediate changes and share many similarities, they are quite often mistaken for one another (Stewart and Cureton 2014)1. The techniques they use are based predominantly on one-on-one meetings (although there are group and team sessions as well). While in the everyday use of these…

  • business,  life

    mindfulness practice for expats’ families

    Being an expat is tough, but it’s even tougher to be the expat’s partner, no matter how we would call them (my preferable term is “a trailing spouse”, but I know that for some people it sounds belittling). When I train, mentor or coach accompanying partners I encourage them to incorporate mindfulness practices into daily life. The purpose is to bring one’s attention to the present moment. There is no judgment involved, your present is neither good, nor bad – it just is. You learn to accept it, but it doesn’t mean that you stop being proactive, by the way. The perfect summary of this practices can be found in…

  • life,  Ukraine

    Kyiv, not Kiev: pre-war thoughts

    A post about Ukrainian capital was on my list for quite some time. You see, I have always felt strong affinity towards the Ukrainians and the truth is, I have no idea why. Western Ukraine used to be part of Poland until WWII and, especially in my region, which was close to the new border, everyone still remembers the atrocities done by Nazi collaborating Ukrainians against their Polish neighbours. I definitely wasn’t born to be a Ukrainophile, just like most of my compatriots I supposed to be a Ukrainophobe instead. But since it’s pointless to talk about being oppressed and offended by someone whose life you practically owned (yes, the…